Food of the Greek Gods

Low fat, no fat, full fat, healthy fat, eat fat, don’t eat fat – if you are as fed up as I am with all these contradictory messages then you can hardly bear to read another word about it. Yet, I suspect that we are going to be hearing more and more about the topic as the ‘facts’ continue to trickle down to the public from research new and some old but only recently revealed. I have written several times recently about this confusing argument in the nutrition world. How is it translating into action in my daily diet?

The biggest change is that I am feeling more relaxed about eating full fat products. In fact, I would go as far as to say that I am now avoiding eating low or no fat dairy. I have had enough of eating 0% yoghurts, for example, that only push more sugars into my bowl. Instead I have begun to buy full fat yoghurt and I must say that I have not yet noticed any weight gain. Perhaps this is because I have cut back in general on how much I am eating in the run up to summer. It would be nice to fit back into my summer trousers. I tried on a favourite pair the other day – lightweight, a neutral shade and not prone to creasing. What more can one ask of a pair of trousers? My side of the bargain is to be able to close the zip. I also have my annual cholesterol test in mind. As usual it is overdue – every year I seem to postpone it while I have a mad dash to knock off a few pounds and to get more lower cholesterol eating onto my plate.

I was recently invited to lunch at The Greek Larder in Kings Cross where my colleagues and I were treated to a tasting of some top quality Greek products imported by Odysea. While we ate our way through plates of mezze we were given a fascinating talk about Greek olives, honeys and details about how Greek strained yoghurt is made. This is the real Greek yoghurt, the full fat variety not the Greek styled low fat stuff. It was deliciously creamy and utterly lovely with a spoon of Pine and Fir Tree Honey which is unique to Greece and the Turkish coast and available in an upmarket supermarket.

This week I decided to buy some full fat Greek Strained Yoghurt. Having spent the past years eating 0% fat Greek Yoghurt I was a bit shocked to realised that my new purchase contained 10% fat. But I was even more surprised to discover, when reading the small print, that the 10% yoghurt only contained 2g sugar while the low fat one had 5.6g sugar. So you either eat the fat and less sugar or less fat but more sugar. I leave it to you to decide. For now I have decided to eat the full fat variety in smaller quantities as it tastes so creamy that one needs less to feel satisfied. Of course adding honey only brings the sugar back into the bowl so I put the jar aside and added a handful of juicy blackberries instead. Food of the Greek gods!

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